Yemeni Revolution and Its Third Anniversary

Yemen has reached its 3rd anniversary of the Yemeni uprising. Today not only makes me happy to the see the masses of people out in the streets remembering this day, but it gives my heart warmth to see that people are still awake even after three years of political roller-coasters and constant worry about their future.

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The masses of people who stood up against the wrongdoings of their government shows the power and resilience of our Yemeni people. We have been through three decades of dictatorship, corruption and unfair treatment by the central system. We have been told  empty promises by our ex-president. Instead of giving us the opportunity to build our lives, he had took away our dreams. Instead of giving us hope, he gave us sorrows. Instead of understanding us and our complaints, he continued to steal our lands and income. Instead of being happy with our president, he made us overthrow him.

Three years later, the people of Yemen show no sign of giving up. Hundreds of martyrs later, people are awake and ready to take the streets again if for any reason they have to. This is the country known to be heavily weaponized. This is the country that holds the most peaceful people, too! Although Yemen holds about 73 million pieces of guns, the people of Yemen would rather use their voices as a weapon to terrify and shake the core of the government.

May this day be the remembrance of not only a life changing historic event, but a remembrance of what the people died for. Our people didn’t die just because they wanted to. Our people died because they believed in something more: change for the better of their countrymen and women. They carry a legacy and our job is to carry on that legacy and do our best to implement their visions for a better homeland for the rest of us. This is our duty for those who died and for the new generations to come.

Here’s a poem I wrote (which was previously posted):

I give you a rose and you respond by shooting me down with a bullet.
I give you a smile and you respond with tear gas.
I stand in front of you and your army and you respond with a water canister.
I sit down peacefully in my protesting square and you respond with live ammunition from tanks. 
I shout a revolutionary slogan and you respond with a stick. 
I’ve responded with tears, silent tears. But you then respond with torture.
My response is peaceful…yours was brutal.
I’m a revolutionary.

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